Blueberry Cheesecake Squares

Blueberry Cheesecake Squares

Blueberry Cheesecake Squares

Guys, if I were to be completely honest…. I made blueberry cheesecake rectangles. And yet telling people that you’re about to feed them ‘blueberry cheesecake rectangles’ doesn’t have quite the same ring to it. So yes, cut them up into squares. Get out a ruler and be absolutely pedantic about it. Or you can just tell them they’re squares and serve them rectangles – that’s how I’d play it!

McVitie's Digestive biscuit base

McVitie's Digestive biscuit base

Shapes aside, the story is that we were invited to someone’s place for dinner and we usually bring something along, more often than not dessert. I volunteered to make it, and since we had blueberry pie filling, I thought I’d make blueberry cheesecake. Now we usually have a go-to recipe for cheesecake, but honestly, it’s a bit of a mission making that one because there are quite a few ingredients involved and more than just a bit of mixing. It was a hot day, I was tired, and I simply wasn’t up for further kitchen slavery. So I decided to ditch it and find a new recipe that would hopefully turn out right. I bought the ingredients, and left the cream cheese on the counter to soften up. Then I tried reading ‘One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest’ in the lounge. Don’t start asking me about it though; I fell asleep and really, it wasn’t my type of book.

Or maybe I should really just admit my failure to digest classics.

I've got great love for food processors

I've got great love for food processors

The good thing is, I digest classic food very well (har dee har har), especially when it comes to desserts, so I’m glad to say that this recipe was very easy to work with. If I can make it in my sleepy dazed state, so can you! Our family’s favourite cheesecake base is almost always made of McVitie’s Digestive biscuits, and I wouldn’t change that for the world. American readers, I haven’t come across graham crackers so I can’t even imagine what it tastes like. By all means, if you love that, you should stick with it.

Try not to put a fork in it and eat it all just yet!

Try not to put a fork in it and eat it all just yet!

If you don’t have blueberry pie filling (and it’s not exactly a supermarket shelf item here in Australia!), you can make your own by cooking down canned blueberries, adjusting the sweetness, and adding in cornstarch which has been diluted in water as a thickener. The next thing I did was to reduce the sugar because that’s just what I do by default, and also due to the sweetness of the blueberry topping I have on hand. I know everyone has their preferred level of sweetness when it comes to desserts, so go with your gut on this one. If you think I’m crazy for cutting down on that 1/4 cup, then add it in. Or you could roll with my version and justify having another slice! Glutton is my middle name, after all.

P/S: I forgot to bring my camera to the dinner party, so excuse the crappy photo of the final product.

Pretty purple layer to top it all off!

Pretty purple layer to top it all off!

Blueberry Cheesecake Squares
Adapted from Dienia B’s Blueberry Delight recipe

  • 400 g McVitie’s Digestive biscuits
  • 125 g unsalted butter, melted
  • 500 g cream cheese, softened
  • 3/4 cup blueberry pie filling
  • 4 eggs
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla essence
  1. Crush the Digestive biscuits into a fine consistency (you can put them in a ziplock bag and use a rolling pin to bash them, or you can use a grinder) and mix well with melted butter. Press into the base of a 9 x 13 inch (22 cm x 33 cm) Pyrex dish or baking dish.
  2. Preheat the oven to 180 degrees Celsius.
  3. Beat the cream cheese, sugar and vanilla essence with a handheld mixer or blitz in a food processor until smooth (I used the latter method!).
  4. Mix in the eggs one by one and combine well.
  5. Pour the cheese mixture on top of the biscuit base and bake for 20 minutes. Do not overbake as the cake will further set upon cooling.
  6. Let cool completely.
  7. Spread the blueberry pie filling on the cheesecake evenly and refrigerate overnight.
  8. Cut into rectangles/squares/whatever shape your heart fancies and serve.
Posted in Cakes, Dessert, Recipes | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Veal Medallions in Creamy Mushroom Sauce

Veal Medallions with Creamy Mushroom Sauce

Veal Medallions with Creamy Mushroom Sauce

I’ve been posting up recipes less often because I’ve joined the corporate rat race. However, my participation is in a much smaller capacity than the ASX (or rather, Wall Street) fanatics since I’m working in a small family-owned business based here in Brisbane. Since my first week wasn’t very intense and I have an early start at 8, I headed home early on one of those days and made dinner.

Chop chop - components of this dish

Chop chop - components of this dish

(Yes, that’s me balancing the mushrooms on my arm – waitressing did me some good!)

Well, I found out that it’s not good for me to be in the supermarket without a single idea as to what to cook, especially as my mom had specifically said ‘no pasta’. That resulted in me, standing at the meat aisle, peering at various types and cuts of meat like a lost child. After much hemming and hawing (by my lonesome), I finally picked up 2 packs of veal medallions and approached one of those kind butchers who happily share their ways of cooking the meats. Her suggestion was to crumb it, but I didn’t really feel like it. What I did take from her though, was the idea to dunk it in milk and egg before dusting it with flour and frying it off. From there, I decided that it’d be a gravy stew of sorts, similar to Stroganoff since I remembered that there was a carton of sour cream in the fridge. Then I couldn’t pass up on beautiful Portobello mushrooms which were discounted. Love it when these elements meld together like a dream come true! This dish goes well with mashed potatoes or rice, and it’d probably be good for you to steam up some greens/toss together a salad. Gotta live up to our human reputation as omnivores once in awhile, no?

Sour cream always did more good than harm!

Sour cream always did more good than harm!

If you’re thinking that this is an indulgent dish, then you’re right. I’m not gonna lie to your faces! I actually had country fried chicken and salty chips for lunch that day, so you can imagine how much my derriere hated belonging to the rest of my body. But there are ways you can make this healthier: use chicken breasts, (reduced salt) chicken or vegetable stock, reduced fat sour cream, the type of oil that you like (I’m sick of the arguments for or against vegetable/canola/olive/peanut/sunflower oil so you can take it up with your neighbours, for all I care). You can even choose not to pre-fry the veal; instead, throw the meat in after the carrots have softened slightly. There are days when all I want is a big bowl of salad with balsamic dressing, so I would understand perfectly. The most important thing? Enjoy the meal.

Better than it looks, I promise!

Better than it looks, I promise!

Veal Medallions in Creamy Mushroom Sauce

Serves four to six

  • 800 g veal medallions, fat trimmed and chopped into chunks
  • 400 g Portobello mushrooms, cut into chunks
  • 2 cups beef stock (you can use the ‘reduced salt’ variant)
  • 1 1/2 cups plain flour
  • 2/3 cup sour cream
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • salt & pepper
  • 1 large onion, chopped into chunks
  • 2 carrots, chopped into chunks
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 tomatoes, chopped into chunks
  • 7 tbsp olive oil
  • optional: dried herbs of your liking
  1. Combine the egg and milk in a bowl. In another bowl, mix together the flour, dried herbs (if using), and salt and pepper.
  2. Dunk the meat into the egg & milk mixture, then coat in the flour mixture. Set aside on another dish.
  3. Heat 1 1/2 tablespoons of olive oil in a pot and fry 1/3 of the veal chunks (about 4 minutes per side). Do not crowd the pan so the meat can brown evenly. Set aside the meat and do not clean the pot. Continue frying the meat in another 2 batches with 1 1/2 tablespoons of oil per batch.
  4. Once you’re done frying the meat, heat the remaining oil in the pot and when that is hot, add in the onions and carrots.
  5. When the vegetables have softened, add in the garlic and fry for 30 seconds before throwing in the meat and tomatoes.
  6. Continue frying for about 2 minutes before pouring in the beef stock. Let it come to boil before turning down the heat to a simmer.
  7. Add in the sour cream and mix well. Then, add in the chopped mushrooms.
  8. Simmer for about 10 minutes on medium heat before turning the stove off.
  9. Scoop into a large serving bowl or individual plates. Serve immediately with your choice of carbs and greens.
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Chicken & Pesto Fettucini

Chicken & Pesto Fettucini

Chicken & Pesto Fettucini

A mortar and pestle doesn’t count as essential items in a kitchen, I’ll admit – but that didn’t exactly stop me from pestering the family to buy one. It’s true; with all sorts of blenders and kitchen gadgets out there, you’d probably save yourself that extra energy and elbow grease just by pressing ‘pulse’. The parentals actually went through the pros and cons of buying a smooth vs rough cut, a bigger set vs a smaller one, where they should source one, etc. Me? I just wanted a set! After all, isn’t there just something unbelievably rustic and feel-good about these stone bowls and bats?

… Or maybe I’m just a 60’s housewife incarnate. Yeah, okay.

The new baby in the kitchen

The new baby in the kitchen

Anyway, we finally bought a set, and the first thing I decided to make with it was pesto. This recipe is from Frugal Feeding and it sounded too good to pass up. My family is quite indifferent about pesto, and really, this dish didn’t change their minds about it, so let’s just say that my motivation for making this was purely selfish. Hey, at least I’m honest! You can’t please everyone, yes? The good thing is if you love pesto, you’ll have no problems with making your own, especially if you have a nifty blender. Or you can be old-fashioned like me and pound everything up in the mortar!

Elbow grease needed here.

Elbow grease needed here.

I did notice though, that pine nuts are unbelievably expensive for a measly amount, so I changed it to a mixture of pine nuts, sunflower seeds and pepitas. This does make the pesto a bit drier (and the other seeds are more hardy so whack them good) so you will need to drizzle in more oil, and reserved pasta water when you toss it with the fettucini. Unfortunately, I forgot to toast the nuts and that would’ve made a lot of difference, so don’t be like me. I also lessened the amount of parmesan as my father is slightly lactose intolerant. Naturally, being a dairy freak, I would’ve thrown in a whole cow had I been given free rein; restraint is not my strongest suit so there is an upside to dad’s condition after all! Feel free to use chicken or turkey mince or even fish if that’s what you prefer, but stay away from the red meat for this one.

Now work it good!

Just tell yourself it's good exercise!

Just tell yourself it's good exercise!

Chicken & Pesto Fettucini

  • 400 g fettucini
  • 4 chicken fillets, sliced
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 cup pesto
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • salt & pepper to taste
  • to serve: grated Parmesan
  1. Boil fettucini until almost al dente (it will be heated again) and drain. Reserve 1/2 cup pasta water.
  2. Heat 1 1/2 tbsp of olive oil in a pot and fry the chicken slices until cooked through. Remove from pot.
  3. Pour in the remaining olive oil and add in the garlic. Fry for 30 seconds before adding in the chicken slices again.
  4. Add in the pesto and reserved pasta water. Season, mix well, and throw in the fettucini.
  5. Turn off the heat and toss well.
  6. Ladle into individual serving bowls and serve with grated cheese.

Homemade Basil Pesto
Adapted from Frugal Feeding

  • 1 1/2 cups basil leaves, washed and dried
  • 1/2 cup seed mix (including pine nuts), toasted
  • 1/4 cup grated parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic
  • juice of 1/2 lemon
  • salt & pepper to taste
  1. Using a mortar and pestle or blender, grind everything except the olive oil.
  2. Slowly mix the olive oil into the mixture and combine well.
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Mini Pan de Sal (Mini Filipino Dinner Rolls)

Mini Pan de Sal (Mini Filipino Dinner Rolls)

Mini Pan de Sal (Mini Filipino Dinner Rolls)

All ye bread lovers, I’m sure you know this moment. Oh yes, you do. It’s when you’re at a restaurant and your main course arrives. And you groan inwardly, thinking, ‘damn, I shouldn’t have eaten all those bread rolls!’

The magic that is yeast.

The magic that is yeast.

If you’ve got a guilty look across your face now, don’t worry, you’re not alone! Fresh dinner rolls are simply irresistible when they’re fresh out of the oven, all warm and crusty. Break it open, slap on some butter, and chomp. That mix of crust and soft bread with salty butter is unbelievably good – needless to say, even more so when you get to a restaurant and you’re hungry beyond belief. While you can indeed buy your own dinner rolls from the supermarket, it’s nice to know that making them at home isn’t too difficult. Back in March or so, one of my friends told me about how his mom makes this lovely bread with a mildly sweet flavour called Pan de Sal and I’ve saved the recipe on my phone ever since. Yes, it’s been awhile and I’ve finally gotten to it! Might I say I’m glad I did.

And watch it growwwww.

And watch it growwwww.

This recipe is not like those dinner rolls that you get from the supermarket; those usually have a more baguette-like coating that is more crunchy. Instead, these are soft, pull-apart buns that have a more pillowy texture, quite like burger buns. You can choose to make them larger and cut them up however you wish to eat them. I made small ones simply because I find them cute (I am a girl, after all), and they probably bake slightly quicker.

They're better fresh out of the oven, trust me.

They're better fresh out of the oven, trust me.

These dinner rolls are best savoured as you usually would: as is, with butter slathered on, to mop up gravy, with soups, etc. I actually made pesto fettucini to go with these (recipe soon, methinks!) and I wasn’t surprised that my mother enjoyed the bread more, savouring them with good butter. See, some people would actually skip the bread rolls at restaurants in order to save their stomach for the main course, whereas my mother can never resist having them. And that is exactly how I justify my love for bread rolls: it runs in the family. Just ask my mom!

Bread & pasta - ultimate comfort food.

Bread & pasta - ultimate comfort food.

Mini Pan de Sal (Mini Filipino Dinner Rolls)
Adapted from THEO72’s contribution in AllRecipes

Makes about 25 mini rolls

1 cup warm water
1 teaspoon instant yeast
8 tsp white sugar
1/8 cup vegetable oil
3/4 tsp salt
3 cups all-purpose flour

  1. Put the warm water in a small mixing bowl and stir in the yeast and 1 teaspoon of the sugar. Let stand until creamy (about 10 minutes).
  2. In a large mixing bowl, combine the remaining 7 teaspoons of sugar and oil  until smooth. Add the salt, 1/2 cup of flour and the yeast mixture and stir well. Then, add the remaining 2 1/2 cups of flour, 1/2 cup at a time, until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl.
  3. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth, supple and elastic (approximately 10 minutes). Lightly oil a large mixing bowl, place the dough in it and turn to coat the dough with oil. Cover with a damp towel or plastic wrap and let sit in a warm place until the dough has doubled in volume (about 1 hour).
  4. Turn the dough out again onto a lightly floured surface and divide into 4 equal pieces. Form each piece into a cylinder and roll out until the ‘log’ is 1 1/2 cm in diameter. Using a sharp knife, cut each ‘log’ into 3 cm pieces. Place the pieces, flat side down, onto two lightly greased baking sheets. Gently press each roll down to flatten.
  5. Cover the rolls with a damp cloth and let rise for about 30 minutes.
  6. Preheat oven to 190 degrees Celsius, and bake the rolls until golden brown (about 20 minutes).
  7. Tear apart and coat with enough butter to make your thighs cry. Eatnownownow!
Posted in Bread, Recipes, Side Dishes | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Two-Layer Pumpkin Cake with Mascarpone Frosting

Two-Layer Pumpkin Cake with Mascarpone Frosting

Two-Layer Pumpkin Cake with Mascarpone Frosting

It seems like Australia has really grown fond of Halloween! I saw plenty of people in costumes over the weekend, and little kids going around trick or treating – hopefully with more treating involved than tricking since I love candy more than pranks. Duh.

There’s been a pumpkin sitting on our kitchen counter for yonks now. It’s not exactly something we bought for the occasion, but everytime I bring up this pumpkin, Mom says we should keep it. For what, I don’t know. She’s strangely protective over it, probably helped by the fact that visitors seem to think it’s a pretty one. What do you think about it?

Mom's precious pumpkin

Mom's precious pumpkin

Well, I finally got permission to use it! My mom made a lot of sad faces and insisted that I take photos of it before I kill it. Tribute to a dead pumpkin, I call it. And now that Halloween is over, you should feel free to cull any pumpkins you have lying around the house, and make a layer cake!

Like that’s the natural progression of things.

Hello, pumpkin innards!

Hello, pumpkin innards!

Handy tip here on making pumpkin puree:

Pumpkin puree is not something that is readily available here in Australia, unlike the States. I use a handy trick that I was taught by my cousin, Racheal. What she told me to do was cut the pumpkin into half and remove the seeds. Add a little water into a large Pyrex bowl and put the pumpkin into the bowl, fleshy side down, which will leave it sitting on top of the bowl. Then nuke it in the microwave until it’s soft (it should take about 10 to 12 minutes) and when it’s cool enough to handle, you can scoop out the flesh with a spoon. Voila, pumpkin puree! Blend it if you want it smooth. It’s the neatest thing and there’s no need for a steamer, which in my books, is better than awesome because ours is a pain to wash.

Fresh pumpkin puree just like that

Fresh pumpkin puree just like that

So this two-layer pumpkin cake is moist, not overly sweet, and sandwiched with creamy mascarpone frosting. As always, I made changes to the sugar content, switched up the methodology, and I used self-raising flour (yes, that was a lazy move). The original recipe also included a bit of ginger but I left it out as my mom’s not really hyped on ginger. Of course, I must respect that since she did let me slaughter her beloved pumpkin, which she’s probably still regretting. If you love the spicy flavour, I’m sure you can go all out with the cinnamon/ginger/nutmeg. To make up for it, I did add in vanilla essence, but then I’ve always believed that it’s a can’t-go-wrong ingredient in desserts.

Sift in the flour

Sift in the flour

Another move I made was to use butter instead of oil. Again, that is to benefit my butter-troll mother, but you can be sure than it’s less than a cup of vegetable oil, so it wasn’t an unhealthy move as such (don’t quote me on that). The pumpkin puree more than makes up for it, so I can assure you that it will not make the cake dry. As for the frosting, I used mascarpone because it was in the fridge, but you can definitely make the original cream cheese frosting, which I’m guessing would be equally delicious (and slightly less costly).

Time for the recipe, I think. Post-Halloween treat, yay!

Pumpkin cakes out of the oven

Pumpkin cakes out of the oven

Two-Layer Pumpkin Cake with Mascarpone Frosting
Adapted from Diana Rattray’s recipe on Southern Food

2 cups of pumpkin puree
2 cups of self-raising flour
140 g unsalted butter, melted and cooled
4 eggs
1 1/2 cups of brown sugar
1/2 tsp salt
2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp vanilla essence
mascarpone frosting

Line two 9-inch baking tins with greaseproof paper.
Preheat the oven to 180 degrees Celsius.
Whisk together the eggs, brown sugar, melted butter, salt, cinnamon and vanilla essence in a large mixing bowl.
Sift in the self-raising flour and mix gently until just combined.
Pour the batter into the two tins equally and bake for 35 to 40 minutes.
Remove from oven and let cool completely.

How to assemble the two-layer pumpkin cake

How to assemble the two-layer pumpkin cake

Assembly

If the tops of the cakes are cracked, lop them off carefully with a serrated knife.
Place one cake layer at the bottom (flattest side down) and slather on one-third of the frosting with a palette knife up to 1 cm from the edge.
Stack on the next layer and spread half of the leftover frosting on the top. Use the rest of the frosting to coat the sides.
Refrigerate for about 1 hour to let it set, and then slice and serve.

Mascarpone frosting says, "Eat me now!"

Mascarpone frosting says, "Eat me now!"

Mascarpone Frosting

250 g mascarpone
1 tsp vanilla essence
1 cup thickened cream
1 cup icing sugar, sifted

Beat the mascarpone and vanilla essence with 1/2 cup of icing sugar until smooth in a medium-sized mixing bowl.
In another bowl, whip the cream with the remaining icing sugar until stiff.
Fold the cream into the mascarpone carefully and frost!

Posted in Cakes, Dessert, Recipes, Tips | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Classic Vanilla Cupcakes with Mango Buttercream Frosting

Classic Vanilla Cupcakes with Mango Buttercream Frosting

Classic Vanilla Cupcakes with Mango Buttercream Frosting

I have to say, I thought I was being creative when I decided to make these. I had time off work, so I started taking the butter out of the fridge to soften, removed the food processor and other dry ingredients from the pantry and turned on my ‘dancefloor’ playlist. My only worry was whether or not my mom would hang me for using one of the mangoes she had gotten for a dollar each at Aldi. See, it’s mango season now and she’s been on a bit of a mango kick recently, but I figured she wouldn’t mind if the cupcakes tasted good!

Because I obviously forgot to take a photo!

Because I obviously forgot to take a photo!

Everything went perfectly. The cupcakes were a nice golden colour and the frosting was light with the mango flavour popping right through and it wasn’t numbingly sweet. That’s really all I could’ve asked for. I was ready to start washing up the dishes when my mom walked in the door. And immediately, she said, “Mango cupcakes!”

I frowned. Who in the world had ruined my surprise?! I hadn’t even tweeted about it!

Fresh mango! YUMMEH.

Fresh mango! YUMMEH.

Turns out the latest issue of the Woolworths Fresh magazine has a recipe along the same lines. I grumbled a lot, but I felt better once my family started eating them and telling me that it tasted great. Thank goodness. But honestly though, here I thought I wasn’t all too lacking in creativity, only to realise that just about everyone (I have the right to exaggerate) who shops there now has the same train of thought. Boo! I was, and still am genuinely annoyed so I haven’t had a look at it, but I sure hope mine can match it. Haha, talk about defiance!

Frosting is the best part about cupcakes!

Frosting is the best part about cupcakes!

Anyway, this recipe is an old classic which I have modified from Taste. It had enough good reviews for me to decide to try it out, which I’m glad I did as the cupcake was nicely done. As a rule of thumb, I almost always reduce the amount of sugar listed as I find it ridiculous to put cups of icing sugar into frosting. Really, no one needs that much sugar in their bloodstream (neither would their waistlines appreciate it). In this case, the mango would also contribute to the sweetness. The mango cubes on top were definitely my mom’s touch and you can definitely use that as a decoration of sorts if you’re eating them on the same day.

Guess there is a positive side to the heat after all: the abundance of mangoes. YAY!

Ma-ma-ma-mango!

Ma-ma-ma-mango!

Classic Vanilla Cupcakes with Mango Buttercream Frosting
Adapted from Taste.com.au

Makes a dozen

Cupcake ingredients:

100 g unsalted butter, softened
3/4 cup caster sugar
1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
2 eggs
1 1/3 cup self-raising flour
1/2 cup milk

Line a 12-hole muffin tin with cupcake liners. Preheat oven to 180 degrees Celsius.
Cream the butter, caster sugar and vanilla extract until fluffy.
Beat in the eggs one by one until just combined.
Mix in the flour and milk in alternate batches and stir until just combined.
Fill the cupcake cases evenly with the batter and bake for 15 to 20 minutes.
Let cool completely in tin and remove.

Frosting ingredients:

75 g unsalted butter, softened
3/4 cup icing mixture
1/2 mango, mashed
1/4 cup milk

Beat the butter and mango puree in a mixing bowl until it is light and fluffy.
Gradually add in the icing sugar and continue beating.
Add the milk and beat until well combined.
Frost the cupcakes!

Posted in Cupcakes, Dessert, Recipes, Sweet Snacks | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Homemade Old Favourites Ice-Cream Cake

Homemade Old Favourites Ice-Cream Cake

Homemade Old Favourites Ice-Cream Cake

In Australia, there’s a chain of ice-cream stores called Cold Rock and its specialty is mixing together your favourite ice-cream with your favourite chocolate bar/s and fruits. Basically, they mash the ice-cream and chocolate/fruits together on an ice-cold stone and once it’s all beautifully melded together, you have your dream combination. But this isn’t an advertorial for them, so I’ll stop waxing lyrical about how they make your crazy, sweet dreams come true.

Mmm, Oreos!

Mmm, Oreos!

Anyway, this dessert is like having Cold Rock in your own home, but made a little in advance. You can still customise it the way you like it, but you can feed more people! When I thought about putting this dessert together for a best friend’s farewell party, it had been a warm few days (can you tell that I dislike the heat?) so if it’s hot where you are, this will be great. I didn’t really bother with recipes and stuck with old favourites for this ice-cream cake.

Vanilla ice-cream + Violet Crumble layer

Vanilla ice-cream + Violet Crumble layer

Here’s what you need to know:

It might’ve taken me about 10 to 15 minutes to put together.

Everyone at the party might’ve said it was good.

Another friend might’ve even given it a ten out of ten.

And they all had fun guessing what was in it!

Chocolate + Chokito layer going on!

Chocolate + Chokito layer going on!

If that doesn’t all agree with you, I don’t know what will! I did mention that it only takes about 10 to 15 minutes to assemble it, right? Use your favourite flavours of ice-cream and chocolate bars. What I chose was an Oreo biscuit layer, followed by vanilla ice-cream + Violet Crumble, chocolate ice-cream + Chokito, and finally cookies & cream ice-cream with chocolate chips. All you need after that is the patience to wait for it to set, which will take about 2 to 3 hours. Make dinner, eat dinner, play charades and then have your own homemade ice-cream cake, which is technically made from storebought ice-cream, but let’s not argue about technicalities here!

Final layer of cookies & cream with chocolate chips!

Final layer of cookies & cream with chocolate chips!

If the Oreo layer doesn’t seem to come together like the biscuit base of a cheesecake, don’t worry as it’ll set in the freezer anyway. By the way, if you do use Chokito, be warned that the caramel inside will harden so don’t just bite into it with much gusto or you might find that you’ve dislodged a tooth. Either that, or use another brand of chocolate. Heaven knows I certainly had trouble trying to restrain myself from reaching out towards a large bag of Maltesers, mmm! Now, as much as I love both, I’d suggest that you don’t pull out the big guns like Haagen-Dazs or Ben & Jerry’s for this. It’s meant to be a fun, laissez-faire dessert, like when you were a child and didn’t care where the chocolate was made, as long as it tasted like chocolate.🙂

Here we go!

Inside layers of the cake!

Inside layers of the cake!

Homemade Old Favourites Ice-Cream Cake

  • 1 x 2 litre Nestle Peters Chocopolitan Ice-Cream, which has vanilla, chocolate and cookies & cream flavours (or buy your flavours of choice)
  • 2 large bars each of Violet Crumble OR Crunchie (weight doesn’t matter – how I wish that were true for me!)
  • 2 x large bars of Chokito
  • 2 handfuls of chocolate chips
  • 20 pieces of Oreos (about 1 1/2 foil packets)
  • 50 g of unsalted butter, melted
  1. Remove the ice-cream from the freezer (or your shopping bag!) and leave it to soften on the counter.
  2. Line an 8 inch baking tin with greaseproof paper.
  3. Place the Oreos in a ziplock bag and roughly crush them. Reserve a small handful which is then crushed finely.
  4. Mix the Oreos with the unsalted butter and press into the base of the tin.
  5. Break up the bars of Violet Crumble/Crunchie in a mixing bowl and combine these with the vanilla ice-cream. Once combined, layer this on top of the Oreo layer.
  6. Repeat step 5 by combining the chocolate ice-cream with the Chokito bars, and then the cookies & cream ice-cream with the chocolate chips. To reduce mess, mix the chocolate ice-cream in the mixing bowl used in step 5, then mix the cookies & cream ice-cream in the container itself.
  7. Top with fine Oreo crumbs and any leftover chocolate chips.
  8. Cover the tin with foil and put it in the freezer for at least 2 hours.
  9. Slice and serve.
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